NATO AWACS steadfast commitment to the Counter ISIL Coalition

A NATO E-3A Sentry Airborne Warning and Control System (AWACS) aircraft sits on the tarmac in Konya, Turkey. Since October 2016, NATO aircraft have flown over 1, 000 mission hours in support of the Global Coalition to Counter the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria. These AWACS aircraft fly from a base in Konya and help manage the busy airspace in Iraq and Syria. Allies decided to provide AWACS support to the coalition in October 2016. - NATO photo by NATO Channel TV
Mar 12, 2018

MONS, Belgium - NATO AWACS have officially recorded over 1000 mission hours, since October 2016, in respect of the Global Coalition to Counter ISIL.

From orbits over Turkey and international waters of the Eastern Mediterranean, NATO AWACS can look into Syrian airspace using its on board radar and sensor suite. This surveillance has improved safety and has provided better situational awareness to coalition commanders.

NATO AWACS are able to coordinate Coalition aircraft during their missions in the fight against DAESH. In this capacity they act in a similar fashion to an airborne Air Traffic Control capability. This allows them to coordinate aircraft movements and ensure safe airspace use by coalition aircraft. It is important to note that NATO AWACS are not involved in the direction of fighters or bombers onto targets.

"Our job is to make the airspace for the coalition assets much safer. This rare capability is a key contribution and makes a huge difference to all allied aircraft involved,” said Colonel Bas Pellemans, Deputy E3-A Component Commander, Royal Netherlands Air Force.

The expanded AWACS mission contributes to the Counter ISIL effort and is a clear signal of NATO’s determination to help fight terrorism. By providing AWACS support, NATO is demonstrating its resolve to tackle security challenges coming from the south.

NATO AWACS are operating out of Konya, Turkey. They have flown more than 140 mission sorties and more than 1000 hours in support of the fight again DAESH. 17 Nations are currently contributing to NATO’s eyes in the sky.

Story by SHAPE Public Affairs Office

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